Genre: Social Themes


Review: That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim

Posted June 15, 2017 by Samantha in Uncategorized / 1 Comment

Review: That Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba KarimThat Thing We Call a Heart by Sheba Karim
Published by HarperCollins on May 9th 2017
Genres: Assimilation, Coming of Age, Friendship, Social Themes, Young Adult Fiction
Pages: 288
Format: ARC
Rating: four-starsfour-starsfour-starsfour-stars

This young adult novel by Sheba Karim, author of Skunk Girl, is a funny and affecting coming-of-age story for fans of Jenny Han, Megan McCafferty, and Sara Farizan.Shabnam Qureshi is facing a summer of loneliness and boredom until she meets Jamie, who scores her a job at his aunt’s pie shack. Shabnam quickly finds herself in love, while her former best friend, Farah, who Shabnam has begun to reconnect with, finds Jamie worrying.In her quest to figure out who she really is and what she really wants, Shabnam looks for help in an unexpected place—her family, and her father’s beloved Urdu poetry.That Thing We Call a Heart is a funny and fresh story about the importance of love—in all its forms.

*Review originally posted at YABC: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yafiction/21288-that-thing-we-call-a-heart*

Shabnam Qureshi is done with high school, ready to move on to college, and start a new chapter in her life. Her final high school weeks are filled with slip ups, mistakes, and lies, and Shabnam is ready to get away from it all. When she finds a job at a pie shack for the summer, everything changes. Shabnam meets Jamie, a cute boy who seems fascinated by her, and the two bond over poetry. However, Shabnam’s best friend, Farah, whom Shabnam has felt awkward around since Farah started wearing a headscarf, is suspicious about Jamie. As the summer unfolds, Shabnam will learn more about herself, love, friendship, and family.

THAT THING WE CALL A HEART is a beautifully emotional story that tackles stereotypes, first love, cultural norms, and more. Sheba Karim creates an easily relatable protagonist in Shabnam, a young woman who wants to fit in. What I love most about this novel is that it focuses on more than romantic matters of the heart. It delves into romantic love, friendship love, family love, and self-love.

I also love that Jamie isn’t a glaringly suspicious guy. His charm and attention makes it easy to see why someone could get a pretty big crush quickly. Yet, as Shabnam continues her journey, readers will see hints of something a little more selfish in him and the ways in which first love can create rose-tinted glasses. But most of all, Shabnam and Farah’s relationship is nuanced and complex, full of tense moments, heartfelt conversations, and a multifaceted exploration of what it means to be a true friend.

Overall, THAT THING WE CALL A HEART will have you laughing and crying in equal measure.

Samantha

Review: The Weight of Zero by Karen Fortunati

Posted January 7, 2017 by Samantha in Reviews / 5 Comments
Review: The Weight of Zero by Karen Fortunati

ReviewCatherine has bipolar disease. While the manic side is no picnic, Cath knows the biggest danger is Zero, the deep, dark depression side that prompted a suicide attempt. While Cath is on medication and says she’s fine, she secretly keeps a stockpile of meds, ready to use when Zero comes back, as he is sure […]

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Review: Wish by Barbara O’Connor

Posted October 24, 2016 by Samantha in Reviews / 4 Comments
Review: Wish by Barbara O’Connor

ReviewCharlie Reese has been making wishes since the fourth grade- or rather, she’s been making the same wish since then. After being sent to live with unfamiliar relatives far away from the city, she doesn’t think her wish will ever come true. As she befriends a boy named Howard, a dog named Wishbone, and gets […]

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Review: Afterward by Jennifer Mathieu

Posted September 27, 2016 by Samantha in Reviews / 2 Comments
Review: Afterward by Jennifer Mathieu

ReviewWhen Caroline’s autistic little brother, Dylan, is rescued from a kidnapper after a few days, the police also find, Ethan, a teen who has been held captive for four years. Now that both of them are back, and in the same neighborhood, both families are dealing with the new changes. Caroline wants to know what […]

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Blog Tour: Pasadena by Sherri L. Smith

Posted September 20, 2016 by Samantha in Uncategorized / 0 Comments
Blog Tour: Pasadena by Sherri L. Smith

Hi everyone! Welcome to my stop on the PASADENA blog tour!ReviewPrior to starting Pasadena, people had been comparing it to Veronica Mars, and I absolutely agree. If you love the noir, dirty underbelly side to mystery shows, Pasadena is exactly what you need. The story opens with Maggie’s death which the authorities rule a suicide, […]

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Review: This is Not a Test by Courtney Summers

Posted August 19, 2016 by Samantha in Reviews / 6 Comments
Review: This is Not a Test by Courtney Summers

This review is for a feature that Read Diverse Books has going, called Read Diverse Books Year Round. The goal is to read and review books from marginalized voices, #ownvoices, etc., which can include themes such as race, LGBTQA+, and disabilities. If you want to join in on this feature, check out the Read Diverse […]

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Review: Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow

Posted July 18, 2016 by Samantha in Reviews / 2 Comments
Review: Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow

This review is for a feature that Read Diverse Books has going, called Read Diverse Books Year Round. The goal is to read and review books from marginalized voices, #ownvoices, etc., which can include themes such as race, LGBTQA+, and disabilities. If you want to join in on this feature, check out the Read Diverse […]

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Review: Lucky Strikes by Louis Bayard

Posted July 5, 2016 by Samantha in Reviews / 2 Comments
Review: Lucky Strikes by Louis Bayard

ReviewShort and Sweet:Excellent Southern representation + resilient protagonist + family feels rivaling those in Lilo & Stitch= 5 shining starsTo Elaborate…When Amelia’s mother dies, Amelia is left alone in charge of her little sister and brother. The three of them aim to continue running their small, family gas station, but without a parent, the foster […]

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Review: Girl Against the Universe by Paula Stokes

Posted June 2, 2016 by Samantha in Reviews / 4 Comments
Review: Girl Against the Universe by Paula Stokes

Hi all! If you haven’t heard, Read Diverse Books has created a feature called Read Diverse Books Year-Round, which encourages “all book bloggers to read at least one book that falls under one of the following categories every month: 1) A book by and about a person of color, 2) A book by or about a […]

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